What we are doing

We work with ag retailers to improve management of our key soil, nutrient and crop-protection resources by keeping them on our cropland and out of our streams, rivers and lakes.

Why we are doing it

Ag retailers are key players in addressing nutrient runoff by ensuring their customers’ dollars stay on the field for crop nutrition, rather than running off into nearby waterways.

Webinars

Our webinars present the latest nutrient management research and economic returns for ag retailer products and services that improve water quality.

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Ag retailer tools and resources

Learn more about the benefits of products and services your facility offers by downloading our free materials and accessing PARM’s interactive tools.

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Latest News

Cover Crop Termination Tradeoffs

April 15, 2022 Each year the University of Nebraska receives questions on termination timing of cereal covers. This question occurs as farmers consider trade-offs between a positive return on investment from the cover crop, by allowing more biomass growth with the potential for yield loss if termination is delayed too long. Information being shared can be confusing, with one source saying to terminate pre-plant while another says to plant green into the cover. What’s the “right” answer? We don’t know…

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Terminating Cereal Rye After Planting Soybeans

April 12, 2022 Benefits of cover crops can include improved weed control, reduced herbicide inputs, increased water infiltration and improvement of soil health and water quality.[1–3] Adequate cover crop growth is needed to maximize these benefits, but the window of time for such growth is limited by federal crop insurance rules. When asked about his motivation to conduct this trial, Sam Bennett replied, “To contribute to a dataset that shows that planting soybeans into living rye and terminating that rye up…

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Study: Ag Practices Have Caused 57.6 Trillion Metric Tons of Soil Loss in Midwest

March 22, 09:00 AM A new study in the journal Earth’s Future led by the University of Massachusetts Amherst shows that, since Euro-American settlement approximately 160 years ago, agricultural fields in the midwestern U.S. have lost, on average, two millimeters of soil per year. This is nearly double the rate of erosion that the USDA considers sustainable. Furthermore, USDA estimates of erosion are between three and eight times lower than the figures reported in the study. Finally, the study’s authors conclude that…

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Regenerative agriculture beats high input costs

March 10, 09:00 AM As they have looked at, researched and implemented some of the regenerative agriculture practices, Fensky says it all starts with the proper mindset, making a paradigm shift in thinking, being prepared to educate yourself and being prepared to take a few risks. “One of the first things I had to learn was to get rid of the ‘Y’ word — yield,” says Fensky. “It is not about pushing production to maximize yield, we need to be…

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