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Midwest Cover Crops Council has released 2 more cover crop recipes for Iowa after corn silage

March 9, 2020 9:39 am These publications are intended to provide a starting point for farmers who are new to growing cover crops. With experience, farmers may fine-tune the use of cover crops for their systems. Iowa Cover Crop Recipe – Post Corn Silage, Going to Corn: Use Cereal Rye: http://mccc.msu.edu/iowa-cover-crop-recipe-post-corn-silag…/Iowa Cover Crop Recipe – Post Corn Silage, Going to Soybean: Use Cereal Rye: http://mccc.msu.edu/iowa-cover-crop-recipe-post-corn-silag…/ The full list of cover crop recipes can be found here: http://mccc.msu.edu/getting-started/cover-crop-recipes/

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University of Vermont Hiring Post-Doctoral Position in Cover Crop Networks and Farmer Behavior

March 2, 2020 9:42 am The main focus of this post-doctoral position is the analysis of the information ecology and networks of cover crop adopters and non-adopters.  The project is planning a large farmer survey across more than a dozen states in the winter of 2021.  The post-doctorate will work to develop and disseminate the survey, coordinate survey outreach and return rates, and survey analysis including network analysis.  The position will work across a large research team across multiple institutions…

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Variety matters in cover crops

March 2, 2020 9:37 am Rising interest in using cover crops to protect and improve soil in row crop, livestock, vegetable and fruit production systems has led to an explosion in seed availability. It can be challenging for growers to navigate all the choices and decide which seed to purchase. Selecting a cover crop species is the first decision, and this can be assisted using online tools such as the Midwest Cover Crop Council’s selector tools for row crops and vegetables. The…

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Study shows positive effect of cover crops on soil

March 2, 2020 9:32 am Only a fraction of conventional row crop farmers grow cover crops after harvest, but a new global analysis from the University of Illinois shows the practice can boost soil microbial abundance by 27%. The result adds to cover crops’ reputation for nitrogen loss reduction, weed suppression, erosion control, and more. Although soil microbial abundance is less easily observed, it is a hugely important metric in estimating soil health. Read more.

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