Water Quality

State By State Nutrient Use Strategy

Nestled in the headwaters of Lake Erie and the Gulf of Mexico, Ohio farmer John Buck has to monitor nutrients. It’s something he does every day to protect his livelihood and third-generation farm. “It’s important we do things the right way when people start pointing fingers,” Buck says. “It’s better to start using nutrient-reduction practices now than be forced into costly changes,” he adds. Read more

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Ohio ag retailers participate in soil testing, nutrient application survey

A survey of agricultural retailers was undertaken to provide a benchmark of current practice adoption of soil sampling, type of spatial sampling, placement and timing of nutrient application currently being used in Ohio’s two major watersheds. The responding retailers provided services on 3.8 million acres representing 39% of Ohio’s row crop and hay production acres with 1,920,450 in Lake Erie Watershed while 1,910,050 acres were in the Ohio River Watershed.[…]

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Ag attorney sheds light on manure handling, application regulations

Manure Regulation in Ohio Peggy Kirk Hall, Asst. Professor, Agricultural & Resource Law Although long considered a natural fertilizer that can benefit our soils, manure has a history of increased regulation in recent years based on potential impacts to water quality.   The following explains how state and federal law regulates the production, storage and application of animal manure in Ohio. Click here to read more

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Recording and slides available from September 26 webinar for ag retailers

On September 26th, 2014, the IPM Institute hosted a webinar featuring Kevin Elder, Ohio Department of Agriculture and Eric Schwab, Ohio NRCS. The webinar focused on the current state of the Western Lake Erie Basin and what ag retailers can do to improve water quality within the Basin in the wake of the Toledo water crisis. Speakers included:  Kevin Elder, Ohio Department of Agriculture, shared his thoughts on how ag retailers can more effectively promote nutrient management solutions to their farmer…

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Dean announces $1 million water quality initiative

By Suzanne Steel | Posted on 9/17/2014 LONDON, Ohio – Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences announced a wide-ranging water quality initiative yesterday at the Farm Science Review. Called Field to Faucet, the initiative will seek end-to-end solutions to hazardous algal blooms and water quality issues, said Bruce McPheron, Ohio State’s vice president for agricultural administration and dean of the college, speaking to a crowd of 700 people at the Review’s opening-day lunch. “Toledo was a…

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