What we are doing

We work with ag retailers to improve management of our key soil, nutrient and crop-protection resources by keeping them on our cropland and out of our streams, rivers and lakes.

Why we are doing it

Ag retailers are key players in addressing nutrient runoff by ensuring their customers’ dollars stay on the field for crop nutrition, rather than running off into nearby waterways.

Webinars

Our webinars present the latest nutrient management research and economic returns for ag retailer products and services that improve water quality.

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Ag retailer tools and resources

Learn more about the benefits of products and services your facility offers by downloading our free materials and accessing PARM’s interactive tools.

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Latest News

Ag Retailers Across the Midwest and East Coast are Advancing Sustainable Practices

April 15, 2020 9:14 am This season, 126 retailers participated in our survey, servicing over 8.7 million acres across the Midwest and East Coast. Their combined efforts retained an estimated 71 million pounds of nitrogen and seven million pounds of phosphorus on fields, positively affecting water quality throughout the Great Lakes and Mississippi River Basins. For the first time this year, the annual survey report incorporated the economic savings of these loss reductions per practice. Read more.

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MANAGING NITROGEN AFTER A COVER CROP

April 8, 2020 9:00 am While cover crop residue can be valuable for soil health, the organic matter can tie up nitrogen and lead to its immobilization. Tim Laatsch technical agronomy manager with Koch Agronomic Services says when using high carbon cover crops like cereal grains it’s important to terminate it at the right time.  “Number one, the herbicide is going to be more effective,” he says.  “But secondly, it is to limit the effects of immobilization.” Read more.

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Study quantifies benefits of farm tech

April 7, 2020 8:38 am Precision agriculture has become mainstream in commercial agriculture production, and many would agree it is “the way we farm today.” Utilization of technology varies from farmer to farmer, but the decision to invest in technology is commonly tied to the potential for increased efficiency and profitability. Read more.

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Farmers lead in watershed protection

April 6, 2020 8:53 am One of the easiest ways for farmers to start contributing to the improvement of their local water quality is to focus on improving their soil quality, Hogseth said. That includes practices such as armoring the soil, minimizing or eliminating tillage, increasing plant diversity, keeping living roots in the ground year-round, and integrating livestock to recycle nutrients and decrease synthetic fertilizers. Read more.

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